Mable in the Media: International Day of People with Disability 2019

For International Day of People with Disability (IDpWD), members of the Mable community were featured in publications around the country:

Campaign Brief:

Mable Research: Inclusivity of People with Disability has a long way to go in Australia

“A true representation of the 4.4 million Australians with disability is urgently required in the media, arts and wider community, according to new research released today by profit-for-purpose company, Mable”

Click here to read the full article

Women’s Agenda

‘I didn’t see me’: Medicine needs more role models for those with disabilities, by Jerusha Mather

“Every day in science, something wonderful happens. There are breakthroughs, successful trials, conditions cured, and new medicines developed.

Growing up, it was learning about biology and neuroscience in school and seeing these wondrous accomplishments in media coverage that first interested me to the field. However, something I didn’t see in the media was coverage of women in science who also happened to have a disability. I didn’t see me.

I was born in Sri Lanka in 1994 with athetoid cerebral palsy. In my birthplace, I was told by doctors that I would never walk or talk. My parents immigrated to Australia when I was two to give me a better life and I was able to improve my speech and motor functions through the (more) advanced Australian medical system. I can now walk and talk.”

Click here to read the full article

Marie Claire

What An Autistic Woman Wants You To Know About Autism: We chat to Kathy Divine on International Day of People with Disability

“Kathy Divine describes herself as a “visionpreneuer” who shares a positive vision for global ethical leadership through her writing and books.

On top of that, she’s a qualified dog massage therapist, a coach for aspiring authors and a keen drummer.

Divine, 43, is also on the autism spectrum. She was diagnosed at age 35 and started her Instagram account @AskTheAspie to raise awareness about autism so future generations of girls don’t have to wait that long to be diagnosed.

Growing up, Divine always felt different, like she couldn’t keep up. She was sensitive to light and noise and wore earplugs when she went out.

Looking back, the autism diagnosis was obvious, but it took 35 long years for doctors to confirm it – and for Divine to come to terms with it.”

Click here to read the full article

9Honey

I was going to have this child no matter what’: Sydney mum’s fight for her son

“Natalie and her partner hadn’t been together for long when she fell pregnant. Still, she was “very excited” to be expecting her first child.

“Max was actually born seven weeks premature,” the Sydney mum tells 9Honey. “He was only 1400 grams when he was born and spent some time in hospital before coming home.”

Max has Down syndrome, a genetic chromosome 21 condition that can cause developmental and intellectual delays. Natalie had been told there was a one-in-four chance her son would be born with the condition but wasn’t fazed by the news.”

Click here to read the full article

Bandt

A Greater Representation of People With Disability is Needed in Media

“A true representation of the 4.4 million Australians with disability is urgently required in the media, arts and wider community, according to new research released today by profit-for-purpose company, Mable.”

Click here to read the full article

10Daily

Families Say ‘Nice’ Names For People With Down Syndrome Are ‘Misguided’

“A recent Reddit threat highlighted the different names countries use for people with Down syndrome, however, those born with the genetic disorder say their name should be up to them.”

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Mount Evelyn Mail

Understanding autism

“For those who have ever wondered what it’s like to live with autism, Nathan Guy described it as hosting a scattered filing cabinet in his mind.”

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Whimn

‘I Was Told I’d Never Walk Or Talk, Now I’m A Neuroscientist’

“My name’s Jerusha. I am a 25-year-old woman. I am a PhD candidate at Victoria University in the biomedical sciences. I am about to enter medical school. I am also a motivational speaker, a music nut, and a poet. I am a fierce advocate for an inclusive medical profession. And I have cerebral palsy.

I tell you my story because I’ve never let my disability define me. Instead, I let it fuel my life’s passions”

Click here to read the full article